Furney's Nursery

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Category: Pest Control

Perfect Tips For Non-Chemical Pest Control

Chemical Pest ControlHome vegetable gardeners have been trying to avoid usage of chemical pest controls as this has become a new gardening trend main objective is to garden with no pesticides. It is always better to keep the pesticides at bay from the vegetable garden. Here are some common examples of nonchemical pest controls.

Look for plant varieties that have some degree of disease resistance. New hybrid resistant varieties enter the market each year after extensive evaluation. Roses and tomatoes are susceptible to many diseases.

The newer Knockout shrub roses have a strong resistance to common diseases, including leaf blackspot. These roses require no spraying.

Tomatoes suffer from a wide range of disease problems. Today, many hybrids are much less prone to disease.

There are many types of physical barriers to keep insects, birds, rabbits, raccoons or deer at bay. A floating row cover is a lightweight fabric that lets in light, air, and water, but keeps insects out of a row of melon or cucumber vines that are susceptible to wilt disease. The fabric is kept in place along the edges with old boards or other weights.

The cover prevents cucumber beetles from feeding on the plants. As beetles feed, they transmit wilt disease bacteria to water-conducting vessels. In time the water vessels plug up and cause severe wilting and death of the plant.

When vines begin flowering, the cover has to be removed so bees can pollinate the flowers. It’s important to keep young seedling plants protected from beetles so they get off to a healthy start.

Garden fencing is a common and effective barrier to pests.  Use fencing to protect small clusters of tulips or other plants from rabbits and deer. Deer feed on the young foliage and flower buds. A circular wire collar with netting on top gives complete protection from deer or rabbits. The fencing should be as tall as the plant is when flowering.

A small vegetable garden can be protected from deer with a 6-foot tall plastic netting fence around the garden. Deer won’t jump into a small area because of poor depth perception. For a large area, fencing should be at least 8 feet tall.

single-wire electric garden fence will give complete protection from raccoons in a corn patch. The electric shock is harmless and intermittent so it frightens away the raccoons. The wire gives off enough “bite” to discourage return trips to the sweet corn.

Netting of various types can be used as a protective cover for berry plants. For a large cherry tree, it is easier to cover only a few branches. Birds are clever and will find any small opening to bypass the netting. As raspberries are not attractive to birds and require no protective cover.

Probably the oldest method of insect control. The fingers are readily available to do the job. If the idea of picking up an insect is unpleasant, use a pocket knife to push the insect into a can of soapy water. While time-consuming, it can be effective if done daily.

The larger the insect, the easier to see and handpick. The largest is usually the tomato hornworm, although it is sometimes missed because the green color resembles the tomato leaf color.

Handpicking Japanese beetles from roses is best done during cool temperatures in the early morning or evening. The beetles move slower at that time and are less likely to fly away.

Other common vegetable pests that are good candidates for handpicking include the Colorado potato beetle and cabbage worms on members of the cabbage family. Aphid populations can be dispersed with a forceful spray from a garden hose. Repeat until they are brought under control.

Perfect Tips To Control Pests and Insects

Perfect Tips To Control Pests and InsectsAfter months of prepping the soil and tending seedlings, you won’t like the pests and insects to chew up all your fresh vegetables. Deer, small rodents, insects and other creatures can quickly destroy a gardener’s hard work, but there are ways to prevent them from launching a full assault.

In earlier time the gardeners did not have easy access to commercial products and fancy gadgets to protect their lettuce and tomatoes. They relied on techniques passed down from generation to generation.

Old-fashioned fixes included sprinkling hot pepper or concentrated animal urine (specifically, that of a predator such as a fox) throughout the garden bedOther repellents that were commonly used included mothballs, cotton balls soaked in vinegar, crushed eggshells, human hair clippings, bacon grease, soap shavings, and garlic juice. Some gardeners plant marigolds among vegetables, because the flower has an unpleasant smell to animals.

The problem is, these remedies are usually temporary. Animals will find a way around repellents if they’re hungry enough.

In order to control the “Groundhogs, Rabbits and Voles” you can place a barrier between animal visitors and your plants, such as fencing made of chicken wire or mesh plastic. It should be high enough to keep rabbits from hopping over (about 18 inches ) and deep enough to prevent burrowers from getting to root vegetables (at least four inches into the soil). For raised beds, lining the bottom with fine-mesh hardware cloth protects against critters that can dig even deeper, such as groundhogs. Check for large holes under fences or shrubs where bigger rodents may have entered, and seal them with wire mesh or wood planks.

Fabric screens (available pre-cut from $5-25), staked over plants, still allow sunlight and water to penetrate. But they also provide shelter for mice and voles, so if you have those, consider another method.

Keeping Deers away from the garden is one of the biggest challenges. Once they show up, it’s difficult to discourage their return. Deer are creatures of habit, so once they find a spot with enough food to eat, they’ll keep coming back for more.

High fences help keep deer from reaching the tops of vegetable plants, but if that’s is not possible, use a repellent that emits sulfurous odors ( i.e., bloodmeal or egg solids).

You have another problem known as “Garden Buggs“.Insect infestation needs to be controlled effectively. While chemical-based sprays and formulas destroy insect pests and keep rodents and other creatures at bay, they also might contaminate your crops and the environment.

Insecticidal soaps and natural, non-toxic oils such as neem oil, which prevents insects from reaching the maturation stage — are recommended to control whitefly, earwigs, aphids, thrips, and other insects. Various types of Insect and animal repellents are available in garden centers nowadays.